Sarah Roush

Sarah Roush

We are still being held hostage by this stupid Covid 19 virus. Adjustments regarding personal space are being made and it seems like the whole country has finally recognized the value to personal hygiene. Having spent nearly two weeks in a house with an antsy 3 year old, who is bored and missing his playmates, I am starting to fully appreciate the ordeal previous generations had with being stay-at-home parents and why they often seemed so grim in those old photos. Their kids had gotten on their last nerve and undid all the work those women had just completed. No wonder they all look like they are holding back cuss words.

As we continue to wait out this modern-day plague, I sort of wonder if this isn’t some sort of universal reset button by a higher power. What if this is a way of forcing us to evaluate what really is important in our lives? Many families are spending time together like they haven’t since the 1960’s. Instead of children being rushed from one activity to another, they are at home and with any luck, they are learning life skills as they assist around the house. Maybe they are learning good sportsmanship skills from playing board games and learning about strategic reasoning in the process.

Hopefully, people are rediscovering the joy of reading books, magazines and writing letters to friends and family members in order to keep up their spirits. Maybe they are making scrapbooks and creating new memories together. I would like to think parents are remembering what it was like the first time someone showed them how to make a batch of cookies from scratch or how to change the oil in their car and are sharing those same life lessons and moments with their kids, when normally they would just pay someone else for those items. Somewhere someone is rediscovering a hobby they once loved and could not enjoy because of time — tying flies, quilting, yoga or writing poetry, activities that enrich and refresh souls.

Maybe families are reconnecting, despite distance, with daily phone calls to reassure each other they are well, and life is still good, even though many of us are living at a slower pace. Perhaps younger adults are realizing that a job in the trades will be a good way to make a living; mechanics, electricians, plumbers, trucker and linemen are working as well as almost all medical field employees. Everyone is coming to appreciate store workers from the cashiers, to the stock-boys and the greeters who are working hard to replenish, clean and repeat day after day while dealing with crabby and stressed customers.

Perhaps people are just becoming a bit kinder because it feels better to do so.

One thing I do know for certain, our son just dumped an entire container of baby powder in his bedroom and the whole room is now covered with white powder, including all two billion dinosaurs and cars. I know for certain his day care provider is worth her weight in gold and will be receiving a much nicer gift come holiday time. I imagine teachers will be more appreciated in the very near future as parents struggle with new math, grammar, history and geography, I can’t even imagine what they are doing about biology and chemistry classes.

When this is all over, it will be the worker bees who held the country together, not the movie stars or pro athletes, not even all the politicians who will be quick to claim credit. The reset button has been pushed, we just need to make certain we take note and remember what is important.

Written and submitted by Sarah Roush for The Circleville Herald. The views of this column may not necessarily reflect that of the newspaper.

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